“A Man. A Mustache. A Mantra: Alexander Shaler” on Harry’s Five O’Clock Mag

general_web

The following is an expert from my regular column on Harry’s Five O’Clock Magazine, “A Man. A Mustache. A Mantra”:

If wartime had an equivalent in the corporate ladder, General Alexander Shaler was the type who shimmied up that thing so fast, all you had to do was blink and he was suddenly your boss. The expertly mustachioed man had a reputation for wise military maneuvering and intelligent instruction. Never one to go easy on his charge, Shaler was the type of drill sergeant that gave the term its chops. The general asked a lot of his men, and his men gave freely in turn. Because – as many of you reading this in the confines of a centrally heated office probably know – a good boss is a boss you want to work for, even if you go home feeling like you’ve been rung out like a wet towel.  

Click here to read more.

Standard

“A Stud. A Shave. A Statement: Crazy Horse” on Harry’s Five O’Clock Mag

CrazyHorse

The following is an excerpt from my column “A Stud. A Shave. A Statement” as seen on Harry’s Five O’Clock Mag:

Long before the invention of drones and chemical warfare, people had to defend themselves the old fashioned way, like, with hatchets and muskets and stuff. Which makes the war heroes of olden times all the more impressive. Battles were messy face-to-face affairs where the best mode of saving your hide wasn’t say, a tank, but a wiry and well-appointed horse.

Click here to read more.

Standard

“A Man. A Mustache. A Mantra – Emiliano Zapata” on Harry’s Five O’Clock

Screen_Shot_2013-12-20_at_2.52.52_PM

 

The following is an excerpt from my regular series “A Man. A Mustache. A Mantra” as seen on Harry’s Five O’Clock Mag:

“Out of the earth that shook with a cry ‘Conquistadores!’ comes Zapata, the Robin Hood of Mexico. The man with a circle around his name, a machete in his hand, and fire in his blood. Taking by storm and holding by fury. Where he rode they conquered.” – ¡Viva Zapata!

In the ‘50s, the gringos and gringas of Hollywood became belatedly infatuated with Emiliano Zapata, one of the most prominent figures of the Mexican Revolution, which started in 1910 and lasted nearly a decade. Starring what would now be an incredibly politically incorrect, hyper-tanned Marlon Brando and written by John Steinbeck, the film, ¡Viva Zapata!, tried to capture the essence of the man who was hailed in his country as a visionary; a peasant who rose in the ranks to become a leading man of the people. 

Click here to read more.

Standard

Field Trip: “A Man. A Mustache. A Mantra” on Harry’s Five O’Clock

mmm-JD-post

 

The following is an excerpt from my regular series “A Man. A Mustache. A Mantra.” as seen on Harry’s Five O’Clock Magazine:

Tennessee legend, Jasper “Jack” Daniel’s life was bookended by tragedy. His mother died shortly after his birth, leaving he and ten siblings with his father. But our hero took life’s lemons and boldly made, well… the world’s best selling sour mash. (It’s possible Daniels became a licensed distiller as young as age 16.) Jack never married and fathered no children. His days were focused solely on whiskey. And he was known to avoid all shortcuts that could have sacrificed smoothness or flavor in his product. 

Click here to read more.

Standard

Field Trip: “A Stud. A Shave. A Statement” on Harry’s Five O’Clock

mmm-4-post

 

The following is an excerpt from my regular series “A Stud. A Shave. A Statement,” as featured on Harry’s Five O’Clock Mag:

Long before doping schemes and $10,000 bikes there was Marshall Taylor, the first African American to take the title of “World Champion” – and that was forall sports, not just biking. Taylor (one of his many nicknames was the “Worchester Whirlwind”) and his viciously swift wheels paved the way for other African American superstars like Jackie Robinson, Jack Johnson, and Willie O’Ree. 

Click here to read more.

Standard